We sit down with New York Artist Nicholas Rispoli to Talk Art, Life, and Creative Inspiration in Our Latest Issue: The Dapifer Vol. 5 Melancholy We Are.

I first came across the work of Nicholas Rispoli almost 2 years ago in Brooklyn, NY. We exchanged stories about a mutual art gallery connection that that we both had showcased in, him as an artist and me as a publisher. The gallery itself was one that pushed innovation so I was immediately intrigued to learn more about Rispoli’s creative process. Since then we’ve kept in touch and this latest issue presented a great moment to finally sit down and explore the mind and creative rhetoric of the artist a bit deeper.

Artist Nicholas Rispoli for The Dapifer

Check out an exclusive peek at our conversation with the artist below and be sure to browse the issue for the full interview!

 

Fit for Gods by Artist Nicholas Rispoli - The Dapifer

THE DAPIFER:

What’s the first thing you remember creating?

THE DAPIFER:

What’s the first thing you remember creating?

NIC:

Ensembles using old quilts, plastic beads and my mother’s frumpy heels from the 70’s. It was a fleeting phase.

THE DAPIFER:

Where do you create your work?

NIC:

Brooklyn

THE DAPIFER:

Is research an important part of your process? What are you currently researching?

NIC:

Yes. For me researching could also indicate living and experiencing. Specifically, I am researching ancient texts and sources of civilization while finding a lot of curious parallels between the way the first humans lived thousands of years ago and today. The theme of control is an untethered thread strung throughout the history of western civilization, for example. Within many ancient religious texts, the king or leader demands that his people surrender.Threat of punishment here is the major tactic to control his followers so they act in accordance with whatever political or religious code is in effect. In a lot of cases he threatens life, rape and shelter, where gender, creed and race serve as scales for the level of punishment inflicted. A hierarchical system is also present in many of these texts where slaves and women are at the bottom.

Funerary Procession By Nicholas Rispoli The Dapifer

The Dapifer:

What do you think about when you’re working on a new piece?

Nic:

I listen to music and sometimes I see colors and movements. It’s all about a good beat and dope vocals when I am working.

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